this is a site designed to inspire creativity, courage and community. Here you will find a perfusion of inspirational posts, gripping videos, and bold expressions of skill from Payton and his team of contributors.

The Dualistic Demogorgon

The Dualistic Demogorgon

The podcast, Deeper, that I co-host for has led to many incredible opportunities. One of those happened recently when our alma mater approached us and asked if we would convert one of our recent episodes to showcase on their blog. The goal of the blog is to highlight the works and advancements of their graduate students. 

Below you can find the excerpt from our submission and a link to the full article.


In the first episode of Netflix's hit series Stranger Things, the audience is introduced to four boys—Dustin, Lucas, Will, and Mike—who are found sitting around a table playing a spirited game of Dungeons & Dragons.

An impression of apprehension hangs over the scene as the boys wait their fate in the next move of the game. The audience is shaken from the suspense of the scene when Mike reveals the monster of all monsters in the D&D universe. The monster that is most feared by any experienced player, including the three boys sitting around this table. "The Demogorgon!" Mike powerfully shouts as he slams the game piece down.

As a fan of the show you know the Demogorgon is more than just a formidable foe from a popular role-playing game. It is, in fact the name the boys give the monster that breaks out of the Upside Down realm, abducts Will, and terrorizes the small town of Hawkins, Indiana. Moreover, the Demogorgon is a symbol of unspeakable, and at times unseeable, evil, a shorthand for the chaos that visits the otherwise predictable lives of this small town.

The concept of the Demogorgon did not originate with this Netflix series, however. In fact, that evil has a long history and Stranger Things is only the latest in a collection of novels, epic poems, and other works stretching back centuries that reference the terrifying name.

Continue reading and find the full article here. 

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