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The Abandoned Power of Handwritten Letters

The Abandoned Power of Handwritten Letters

When I receive a handwritten note, I am excited to open it. Half the time I don't even know who the note is from, but the art of the postage stamp, the feel of the paper, and the quirks of the author's handwriting pull me in. Alongside the mountain of bills and flyers we receive daily, a handwritten note is a sealed treasure full of promise and potential. 

This cartoon strip has stuck with me for many years in my professional career. The tradition of writing notes and letters has been compromised in our digital age, and people seldom find time for it. However, in our fast-paced world a handwritten note shows you have slowed down and thought about the person. Just the short amount of time it takes to write a note will make all the difference to them. It conveys to people that they are special, they are important, and most importantly that they are worth your time. 

According to Huffpost, here are 9 reasons not to abandon the art of the handwritten letter: 

  • They show how much you care.
  • They make your feel good.
  • They make every word count.
  • They spark creativity.
  • They require your undivided attention. 
  • They require unplugging. 
  • They honor tradition.
  • They're timeless. 

In ministry we are looking to make a lasting impact on people who walk into the church building on Sunday morning. We want people to feel welcomed and comfortable, but most of all we want to share the love of Christ with people. We want to show them that they are worth our time and attention. 

What better way to convey that message than to write them a personal note?

Here is an example of what I send to our visitors. 

Here is an example of what I send to our visitors. 

Every Monday morning I come into my office and find on my desk a list of visitors from the previous Sunday. I then spend intentional time writing each person a note, thanking them for their presence, and welcoming them to come back and connect. Emails are easy to ignore, phone calls can be invasive, but personal notes and letters still have personality and warmth to them. 

So, pick up a pen and some paper and send a little joy someone's way!

Worship as the Ultimate Act

Worship as the Ultimate Act

Hope.