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Four Keys to Inviting Someone to Church

Four Keys to Inviting Someone to Church

When Jesus was asked to sum up everything in one command he said to love two things: our God and our neighbors. This is a nice phrase we often see plastered on bumper-stickers or framed on a living room wall. What would happen if we took this command seriously, though? Do you love someone enough to invite them to know Jesus? How about to invite them to join your church family? This is a daunting task for many, but it does not have to be something we need to continue to fear. 

I want to provide you with four keys to inviting someone to church. As you boldly and proudly embrace your faith and begin extending that invitation to your friends, co-workers, and neighbors, here are something to keep in mind. Where do you begin? How should you go about asking? What must you never forget? Continue reading for your answer! 

  • Form a trusting relationship. One of the hurdles that we must get over when it comes to sharing our faith with people is our ability to relate, connect, and form meaningful relationships with people. Somewhere along the way, most likely with the rise of technology and online interactions, we have lost the skill of building purposeful connections. Simple exercise: imagine your home, your neighborhood, your neighbors. How many of them do you know? Do you know their stories, their background, their name? These are the people who live and sleep 25 feet away from us and yet we have not made meaningful connections with them. A key to inviting anyone to church, be it a neighbor, a family member, or a co-worker, is we must first form a meaningful and trusting relationship with them. Visitors that stay in our churches are the ones that come arm-and-arm with a friend. 
  • Adopt the Double Promise Rule. This is a special rule that can have a major impact if it is adopted. The double promise is simply this: make a promise to never caution and never apologize about your church. Are you proud of your church? Do you love the people, the message, the atmosphere? Sure, the church is not perfect, but if your church is teaching the truth about Jesus, and you want others to experience what you have experienced, you must live unashamed of your church. Make a promise to never preface a person you're inviting: "By the way, we are a church that does or does not do A, B, C," or "There might be a time when you feel comfortable doing…" Let people have their own experience and stop instilling hesitation before they even have a chance to experience. Then afterwards, make a promise to not apologize. Like mentioned, the church is not perfect, but they are applicable, and a good church will preach and teach what that person needs to hear. Don't apologize for the comments that guy made in class, or for the lack of energy the singing seemed to have that morning. Be proud of your church and that will illuminate much brighter than your apologies. 
  • Use your small group as a stepping stone. Our LifeGroup ministry, often known as small groups, are a space to be used to invite our friends and neighbors. I understand it might be intimidating for a friend to join you with a tightly-knit group of strangers in their home, but that invitation goes a long way. People want to feel important, and by inviting them into your "inner-circle" might be a great way to show them that you care about them. Use your small groups to introduce your "invitee" to others, so that when they eventually do join you on a Sunday morning, they have a pool of people they already know. They have connecting points to your church and feel comfortable and accepted much quicker. {If this scenario does happen, a helpful tip might be to tell your small group in a private message that your friend is visiting and having individual people call them by name and welcome them.} Small groups are just another tool you can use as you seek to be intentional in inviting people to your church. 
  • Just ask them! One of the top reasons that people do not attend a church is because they have never been asked. How is this even possible! Yes, this is the simplest of all these tips, but one of the most difficult for us to adopt. Sometimes all we need are 30 seconds of courage to extend an invitation to someone you know to join you on Sunday morning. 30 seconds! If they say no, what have you really lost? In fact, I would say you have gained because not only have you primed your evangelistic pump, but that person will know that the invitation will always be open for them in the future. If they say yes, though. Well, you have just brought someone that much closer to knowing about Jesus. What a reward. So, to keep this simple, just ask. You might be surprised by how many accept your invitation. 

Following Jesus was never promised to be an easy path. In fact, it is the most difficult path to follow and the path continues to grow narrower. This moment, right now, is the most important moment you have. It is right now that you can actually do something! Don't linger on your failures or worry about the future. Embrace the moment, live boldly, and share Jesus with someone. 

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